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Walking Holidays on the West Highland Way

Discover the spectacular landscape of Scotland’s western Highlands while walking the West Highland Way, one of the world's most famous long-distance trails. Towering mountains, tranquil lochs and rushing rivers combine to reward you with a unique and varied landscape as you journey 96 miles from Milngavie (Glasgow) to Fort William.

Since 2003, Macs Adventure has helped thousands of happy walkers enjoy self-guided walking holidays on the West Highland Way. Nobody knows the route, its people and places, better than our team. Our wide selection of itineraries (including our most popular 7 night West Highland Way) are designed to offer something for everyone, from challenge-seekers to those looking for an altogether more relaxed walking holiday. For more information on the route, you can also download our comprehensive guide to the West Highland Way.

From hiking the "bonnie banks" of Loch Lomond, to completing the trail in the shadow of Ben Nevis, this trail is a showcase of some of the best scenery that Scotland has to offer, and a true bucket-list experience.

Discover West Highland Way

  • West Highland Way FAQs
    West Highland Way FAQs

    Q: When is the best time to walk the West Highland Way?

    A: Spring and autumn are two of the favourite seasons for walking the WHW, when temperatures are fine for daily walking and days are often dry. Summer in Scotland is a mixed bag, if you are lucky it will be dry and warm, but you are more likely to get this weather in spring and autumn. 

    Q: Will I need a map and compass?

    A: The WHW is waymarked with clear signposts and marker posts. For the most part, these are easy to see and follow and booking with Macs Adventure, not only do you get a comprehensive map and guidebook, but you can also download our app, which has the WHW route already loaded. 

    Q: Are midges a major problem?

    A: There is no denying that midges can be a nuisance. They will bite if they find bare skin but they do not cause illness. Some people suffer from itchy bites.

    The worse time for midges in Scotland is June to August when the weather is warmer yet still damp. The best solution is to carry midge repellent with you. See our Say Goodbye to the Midges blog for repellent ideas.

    Q: Will my accommodation be close to the route?

    A: We endeavour to book accommodation as close as possible to the West Highland Way.  Generally, you will only have to walk less than a mile from the route to get to your overnight accommodation. We provide comprehensive details to guide you to your accommodation is each night. 

  • Essential West Highland Way Facts
    Essential West Highland Way Facts

    Length - The West Highland Way stretches for 96 miles, from Milngavie in the South to Fort William in the North. There are many ways to break up this journey and for the best information on how many days to walk the route, check out our blog post - How Many Days to Walk the West Highland Way

    Toughest Section - The jury is out on this, but here in the office, we think it is the section from Rowardennan to Inveroran. The path twists and turns and there are roots and rocks and steps. The path is completely beautiful, however, leading you along the banks of Loch Lomond, but it requires a lot of concentration. 

    Weather - The weather on the West Highland Way is very changeable, so it is always wise to pack for 4 seasons in one day. The best resource for checking the weather on the route is the Scottish Mountain Weather Information Service Website

    Wildlife - There is a wide variety of wildlife on the West Highland Way. There is a huge range of birdlife including golden eagles and peregrine falcons as well as the chance to see red deer and feral goats. Our wildlife expert has put together a comprehensive blog on Wildlife on the WHW

    MidgesThe one creature you do want to avoid on the West Highland Way is the dreaded midge. These tiny, swarming insects are not dangerous, but they are a pain in the neck, sometimes literally! While they are an annoyance there are many ways to avoid them. You can see our tips to minimise the midge factor in our handy blog post

    Toughest name to pronounce - The first stop on the West Highland Way is probably the toughest to pronounce. Milngavie is actually pronounced Mul-guy. Strange eh! Other tough ones are Drymen (Dri-min) and if you remember that most -ch sounds are pronounced like you are gently clearing your throat, then you will be good to go. A hard -K sound will do, i.e. Lock Lomond, but the gravelly -ch will make you sound like a local!

  • West Highland Way Video Diary

    Dan, our resident wildlife expert, took to the West Highland Way and recorded his whole journey.  This video shows you the full route, from the starting point in Milngavie, through all the points of interest, to the finish in Fort William.  Dan points out some interesting things along the route that you shouldnt miss, but this is not a video laden with spoilers.  Every journey on the West Highland Way is different, dictated by the weather, the people you meet and the chance encounters with wildlife (human and otherwise!) Get a taste of what is in store on the West Highland Way with Dan.  

  • The West Highland Way

    For an oversight of the West Highland Way, its history, its logistics and how it feels to walk, this is the video for you.  Ewan discusses some of the finer points of walking the route, with the background of Loch Lomond, shows how the baggage transfer works and how easy Macs Adventure make walking the West Highland Way. 

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